Author

Jan Trewartha

is the founder and director of the British Fascia Symposium and The Fascia Hub. She has been in healthcare since 1979, originally training as a State Registered Nurse in the Queen Alexandra Royal Army Nursing Corps (QARANC), working with patients on the wards and in the operating theatre; a superb if non-deliberate foundation for her future career. In 1988, being trained by a blind massage therapist to really ‘feel’ the body, led to a lifetime passion for body work. Jan was a massage volunteer at the Auckland Commonwealth Games where she learned from professionals from all modalities. Her work now is the culmination of many years of training and experience in different disciplines. Through her school, Body in Harmony Training, Jan runs a variety of light touch therapy courses, including Sharon Wheeler’s ScarWork for which she was the first accredited tutor in the UK.
To learn more about Jan please visit her website: https://www.bodyinharmony.org.uk/.
Jan is also the author of the book Scars, Adhesions and the Biotensegral Body, published by Handspring Publishing in May 2020.

Why is biotensegrity a better explanation of our movement than traditional biomechanics?

“The commonly accepted ‘tower of blocks’ model for vertebrate spine mechanics is only useful when modeling a perfectly balanced, upright, immobile spine. Using that model, in any other position than perfectly upright, the forces generated will tear muscle, crush bone and exhaust energy……..” Stephen Levin[1] In her book Yoga, Fascia, Anatomy and Movement (reference as…

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Why is biotensegrity a better explanation of our movement than traditional biomechanics?

“The commonly accepted ‘tower of blocks’ model for vertebrate spine mechanics is only useful when modeling a perfectly balanced, upright, immobile spine. Using that model, in any other position than perfectly upright, the forces generated will tear muscle, crush bone and exhaust energy……..” Stephen Levin[1] In her book Yoga, Fascia, Anatomy and Movement (reference as…

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Do not forget the hidden scars

When we think of scarring, we tend to visualise a linear or other scar, caused by surgery or injury; normally visible, something we can focus on and work with in order to minimise its impact on local and even body-wide tissues, organs and systems. However, scars may be the result of other less tangible causes;…

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Do not forget the hidden scars

by Jan Trewartha When we think of scarring, we tend to visualise a linear or other scar, caused by surgery or injury; normally visible, something we can focus on and work with in order to minimise its impact on local and even body-wide tissues, organs and systems. However, scars may be the result of other…

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A new approach to working with Pelvic Organ Prolapse

POP – Pelvic Organ Prolapse – “….is defined as the symptomatic descent of female pelvic organs and is often described as when the organs in the pelvis slip down from their normal position and bulge into the vagina”.[1]  Anna Crowle, an experienced physiotherapist, also trained in osteopathic, clinical massage and advanced myofascial methods, is lead…

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Working with Caesarean Scars

  As a scar specialist, I work with many women with a Caesarean scar (CS); sometimes they have three or even four scars, one on top of the other, each time the surgeon possibly having cleared out adhesions and each time possibly more adhesions having formed.  This is complex and sensitive work as we unravel…

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